Serological Screening of HBV and HCV among Patients with Suspected Liver Diseases Seen at a Tertiary Hospital in Bauchi, Nigeria

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Alkali Mohammed
Okon Kenneth Okwong
Yusuf Bara Jibrin
Umar Mustapha Sabo
Abdulrazak Toyin

Abstract

Background: Epidemiological data of HBV and HCV in Bauchi state is still relatively limited, thus creates an epidemiological information gap in evaluating the public health problem, its negative clinical sequlae and high morbidity and mortality rate. This retrospective study evaluated the seroprevalence of HBV and HCV infections among patient with suspected liver disease cases presented over the study period.

Methodology: The retrospective study was conducted among patients admitted to the Medical wards and Pediatric wards of ATBUTH, Bauchi between January 2012 and August 2017. Data on serological screening were extracted and analysed.

Results: A total of 2099 cases were serologically screened and analysed for Hepatitis B and C. Overall seroprevalence was 21.7%, HBsAg was detected in 16.7% cases and Anti-HCV in 4.4% of cases. Peaked seropositivity was observed in 2013 and 2016. Male preponderance and statistical significance difference were found between the seropositivity, gender and age group in 2013(p<0.001) and 2016(<0.0001).

Conclusion: The findings revealed the endemicity of HBV and emerging increase in HCV in the study area. Though this data might not be a true representation of viral hepatitis infection in the study area but had provided an insight to the epidemiological picture and need for infection control and preventive measures.

Keywords:
HBV, HCV, seroprevalence, liver disease, Bauchi

Article Details

How to Cite
Mohammed, A., Okwong, O. K., Jibrin, Y. B., Sabo, U. M., & Toyin, A. (2018). Serological Screening of HBV and HCV among Patients with Suspected Liver Diseases Seen at a Tertiary Hospital in Bauchi, Nigeria. Asian Journal of Research and Reports in Gastroenterology, 1(1), 1-7. Retrieved from https://journalajrrga.com/index.php/AJRRGA/article/view/25422
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Original Research Article